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raising the debt ceiling. lou: the fiscal cliff and now a new ultimatum on the national debt ceiling. you suppose this is the last condition? >> it's going to be a wild couple of months, maybe everybody thought with the election over, there was going to be peace and figure all of this out, but i think we're just at the beginning of a long protractive battle, lou. lou: more on the stalemate of the fiscal cliff, the impasse, and tell us what you think about the so-called negotiations. vote in tonight's online poll. do you agree president obama's ultimatum on higher taxes are actually the cause? make him responsible for driving us off the fiscal cliff? go to our to be page at facebook facebook.com/loudobbs. we'll have results at the end. chris and steven joining us here next to address that question and more. ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ malennouncer ] lease a 2013 e350 f $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. lou: hous
the fiscal cliff and america's debt are pushing some seen here to renounce the pledge. i've been highlighting members of congress who have recently said they're getting over grover. one, tom cole, says he is not bound anymore. representative cole, you wrote allowing taxes to rise for the top bracket may seem acceptable by comparison, but this path would be enormously damaging for the economy. which meant you weren't going to do it. now, you've been urging your fellow congressmen to at least extend the bush era tax cuts to those making less than $250,000 and then do battle over tax cuts for the wealthy later. what has changed your mind? >> frankly, nothing, and you've mischaracterized my position. i'm not for raising tax rates on anybody. it's going to slow down, hurt rates. that's my position. not just because i signed a pledge, because that's what i believe. what i have said is we agree with the president that taxes on 98% of the american people shouldn't go up. that's his position. that's our position. why not just take that off the table right now? it's 80% of the bush tax cut. we could ma
vance. tonight, president obama issued yet another warning to republicans, do not use the fiscal cliff to start a fight over the debt ceiling. the u.s. could reach its debt ceiling by the end of the month, and risk defaulting on its loans early next year. house speaker john boehner today said, quote, we don't have time for the president to continue shifting the goal posts. we need to solve this problem. danielle lee now joins us from capitol hill with more on this story tonight. danielle? >> reporter: jim, good evening. we're just now learning that president obama spoke to house speaker john boehner by phone this afternoon. but we're not hearing of any progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff or on raising the nation's debt ceiling which is currently at $16.4 trillion. there are new concerns about what could happen to the country's credit rating in the new year. each day toward the fiscal cliff is also another day closer to the country maxing out on its borrowing limit. president obama talked to business leaders today. >> the only thing that the debt ceiling is good for as a weapon is to
the pieces coming together on the fiscal cliff some increase in marginal tax rates coupled with some kind of cutting back on tax expenditures. the real concern is shifting or will shift from the fiscal cliff to the debt limit. it's not clear that the republicans will agree to including a debt limit increase in that kind of package and if they don't, we may get past december 31st only to find ourselves with a big problem in february or march. >> the obama administration has been clear they will not sign anything. even to get past december 31st. so do you think they can hold firm on that if republicans offer them a package that doesn't include the debt ceiling? >> this is where i think the tension is now arising, which is even if you have some agreement over the tax rates which will jam the republicans a bit, can you jam them on the debt limit also, the concern will be an administration overstepping or overream reaching and trying to jam in the kinds being discussed now. i'm all in favor of getting rid of the debt limit. it makes no sense from a technical perspective. but it's probably a br
mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially entirely avoidable blow to the economy, the president proposed a plan the members of his own party will even vote for. he is not interested in a balanced agreement, not particularly interested in avoiding the fiscal cliff, and clearly not interested at all in cutting any spending. with the president is really in, as we learned just yesterday, is getting as much taxpayer money as he can, first by raising taxes on small businesses who he believes are making too much money, and then on everybody else. not so he can lower the debt or the deficit, but so he can spend to his heart's content. for months, the president has been saying that all he wanted to raise taxes on the top 2% so he can tackle the debt and the deficit. howeve
a fewtoday we are going to talk about three issues briefly. one is that fiscal cliff, to is the debt ceiling. three is the so-called big deal that has to be done on our debt and deficit. unfortunately those issues, convoluted, especially in this town. they are distinct. the impact each other but they are distinct. this fiscal cliff is an artificial state. congress came in, said this law expires on this date. they extended it wants. they put in the sequestration. it is a date. all they have to do is extend the date and allow themselves time to discuss the issues. instead they are putting it all into a lame duck session. that is a problem. sometimes it leads to bad policy. the fiscal cliff can have real consequences. cbo has said that it would cause a recession if we were to go off the fiscal cliff. i do not dispute that i do point out that in 1993 when these taxes were first put in, many said they will cause a recession. they did not. the economy is improving on its own right now. and getting some much stronger. the impact of the fiscal cliff, while not something to be encouraged, may not be
in their heels, and with no move to avoid the fiscal cliff, or to raise the debt ceiling which is currently at $16.4 trillion, now there's new concern about what could happen to our credit rating in the new year. each day toward the fiscal cliff is also another day closer to the country maxing out on its borrowing limits. president obama called it a dangerous lesson when he talked to business leaders today. >> the only thing that debt ceiling is good for as a weapon is to destroy your credit rating. >> reporter: he's worried republicans may refuse to raise the debt ceiling and risk defaulting on the country's loan. >> that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses. and it is not a game that i will play. >> reporter: republicans are pushing back. >> he's the president, not the emperor. he does not have the power. >> reporter: fiscal cliff negotiations have been at a standstill since monday. not by raising rates on the rich as the president had insisted. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite, but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of reve
to the rest. >> right now we are facing a fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling. before that, we were looking at several potential government shutdowns. at a different level, the appropriations process has not worked as intended for years. neither has the budget process. it seems like abnormal is the normal. that type of activity in this situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential showdown, as he suggested, with the next debt ceiling altercation, this creates uncertainty, which is not good for the private sector and certainly is not good for the federal government in terms of its ability to function in a normal way. how can congress break out of this? >> do what we are hired to do and to appropriations in a timely manner. in virginia, we have a lot of defense contractors very concerned about sequester. many of them say, warner, warner, do simpson-bowles. everyone supports it, but no one has read it. but the top line numbers are almost the same -- next time you do a default, do not make it so awful. putting a gun to your forehead -- that is what you have
revenue. >> talks about the fiscal cliff and the meeting between president obama and john boehner -- >> the president is trying to do two things. he is trying to both reopen negotiations, direct negotiations between him and the house speaker, the deal be struck between them. at the same time he is going to michigan tomorrow, where he will make the same case to autoworkers, the same types of middle-class people who helped him get elected in the industrial midwest. >> democrats are seen to have the most leverage in negotiations. it seems the options for republicans are narrowing. >> president obama has said he will not make a deal without an increase in the tax rates on people who make more than $250,000, which is something that republicans refuse to do. they want -- do not want to raise tax rates on anyone. as senator corker of tennessee said -- president obama holds the cards. >> what do you think his opinion represents? is this just one senate republican, or does this show kind of a shift in attitude among republicans? >> it certainly shows -- a number of republicans are looking
fears about the fiscal cliff and america's $16.3 trillion debt are pushing some, seen here, to renounce the pledge. i have been highlighting members of congress who said they are getting over grover. one of those members is tom cole of oklahoma. he signed the pledge and says he's not bound by it anymore. representative cole, a month ago you wrote allowing taxes to rise for just the top bracket may seem an acceptable middle ground by comparison. but this path would be enormously damaging to the economy, which meant you weren't going to do it. now you have been urnling your fellow congressmen to at least extend the bush era tax cuts to those making less than $250,000 and then do battle over tax cuts for the wealthy later. what changed your mind? >> first of all, nothing changed my mind. frankly you mischaracterized my position. i'm not for raising tax rates on anybody. i don't think it's a good idea. bad for the economy. going to slow down, hurt rates. that's my position, not because i signed a pledge. that's what i believe. what i have said is we agree with the president that taxes on 98
to debt a handle on the fiscal cliff, we cannot lose sight of their urgent priority of making sure we have job growth -- job creation, to say the least. many of the components you have outlined -- that both of you have -- it comprised of the broad description of the fiscal cliff whether it is the expiring tax cut provisions, the expiring tax cut extensions, and spending cuts as well. if you consider more, which of those would you consider having the biggest bang for the buck in terms of economic impact of those that we are discussing here today? >> it is a given that we will extend the current tax rates for taxpayers that make less than $250,000 on an annual basis. that is absolutely necessary. when you consider the other things that are happening -- in terms of the bang for the buck, the emergency unemployment insurance program is very effective. it is small in the grand scheme of things. cbo is estimating it would costs per calendar year about $33 million. but the economic opportunity for job growth compared to the unemployment rate would be measurably more than that. we are down to go t
to just worrying about the debt and the fiscal cliff and such. our program today, i am welcoming you. joan walker will welcome you as well. ed reilly will give the polling results, and ron brown will do the interview and then we will have a panel discussion. it will be a terrific day. please turn these babies off. again, welcome. joan walker is executive vice president of allstate. joan has been a terrific partner with us over the last four years. she is responsible for all relations for allstate. prior to joining that company, she did similar work with monsanto. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what this town of washington is all about. that you very much, and welcome our friends here. [applause] >> ok, good morning, and thank you so much for that kind introduction. "the atlantic" and "national journal" have been terrific partners in this effort. i thank them very much for that, and many thanks to edward reilly, who will take us through the data today, and also for jeremy, an associate, who was the lead researcher on the poll. we have interviewed 25,00
on the fiscal cliff be the grand bargain that puts the debt issue to bed or just enough to get past the cliff? or could the president get big concessions from john boehner and force liberals to sign off a-o a big inteelgtsment change? much more talk the past week about hillary clinton gearing up to run for president. in a new washington post poll, her numbers like like they would give her a quick route to the nomination. and a strong chance to win the white house for a clinton third term. join me and david ignatius, john harris, michele caruso ka fwrar cabrera for a great round table. here's what's coming up on "meet the press." ma,ñ0ót5 behind?n00o thisu this morning i'll go inside negotiations with two lawmakers close to them, dick durbin of illinois and congressman, one of boehner's top advisers. i spent time on capitol hill this week. one question i'm dealing with this morning, what has actually changed since last summer's debt debacle? my sense is we may be closer to a deal than some of all the publicr7ó(w- leads to you believe. we'll talk about that. with our political round ta
in january. the president's warning republicans not to include any debt limit concessions in their fiscal cliff strategy. >>> we have had a lovely week around here. but it's time to get back to a little december reality. >> would you look at that. veronica has a look at another change coming our way. what about it, veronica? >> do you like that sunset? isn't that gorgeous? >> it's lovely. >> fiery red there on the horizon. and not a bad day. the wind picked up a bit. that northwesterly wind behind the cold front that came through very early this morning. high temps in fact for today, 60 degrees. that was at 5:00 a.m. we now stand in the mid-50s. pretty much falling temps all day. now 55 degrees. trinidad, and good afternoon to you folks in tyson's corner. up north, already in the 40s. kensington at 48, with temperatures dropping. and these winds have been rocking us today out of the northwest. still at 20-mile-per-hour gusts. those will be settling down. as that happens, it's going to get cold. subfreezing temperatures due by tomorrow morning. we're going to see the numbers really drop du
that in the summer of 2011, we nearly went over the fiscal cliff by not paying our debts. that caused our bonds to be downgraded because we had an element within the republican conference that was willing to take us to the cliff and hold us hostage. when you look back and see historically that the debt ceiling was raised 17 times, under ronald reagan and eight times under george h. w. bush canada seven times under bill clinton and six times under george w. bush, really it is honoring the full faith and credit of the u.s. government. , iaching that to a debt understand ideologically why people might want to do that, but why would you take the nation to this process? there was a passage of a special select committee. that select committee, if it did not respond with further cuts and tax increases, would seek a so-called sequestration comoe spending domestic and military spending. already in congress we obscene that while the cuts have been made on the military side, some would say there's more to come and on the domestic side and others would argue there's more to come there, the cuts have been s
-span web page dedicated to the fiscal cliff. the combined things related to the issues. it is all at cspan.or g/fiscalcliff we will have a discussion about change and how u.s. debt, economic growth, and retirement of baby boomers could lead to political and economic change. >> the house returns tomorrow. members will be coming in to consider defense department programs for next year. we will have live coverage of the house tomorrow at 2:00 eastern right here on c-span. >> i think people still love discovery. the ability to find surprises. every month or every year, people are suddenly talking about some show. you could've said to me, mike, i want you to choose honey boo boo, or a certain food channel network. i do not think if i had to determine that, i ever would -- at the ability to stumble on them, and then double around and that and find, i sort of like honey boo boo, that is a huge part of the american television experience. i think it is sold short when its techno ecstatic. i think a lot of americans love the enjoyment of escapism and passivity and being able to roam around the tv ju
turn to the rest. >> right now we are facing a fiscal cliff. last year we were facing the debt ceiling. before that, we were looking at several potential government shutdowns. at a different level, the appropriations process has not worked as intended for years. neither has the budget process. it seems like abnormal is the normal. that type of activity in this situation where we are already looking ahead to the next potential showdown, as he suggested, with the next debt ceiling altercation, this creates uncertainty, which is not good for the private sector and certainly is not good for the federal government in terms of its ability to function in a normal way. how can congress break out of this? >> do what we are hired to do and to appropriations in a timely manner. in maryland, we have a lot of defense contractors very concerned about sequester. many of them say, warner, warner, a nuisance and-bowles. -- do simpson-bowles. everyone supports it, but no one has read it. but the top line numbers are almost the same -- next time you do a default, do not make it so awful. putting a gun to
of santa barbara. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here in california. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. if the democratic party is so good, then why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time the unions, instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns give that money back to the membership so they can maybe pay their own wages and tax bears and people like me that live on fixed incomes don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we have worked hard to make? guest: you have worked hard. number one, i cannot comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. reports are that things are starting to turn around a little over there. it's tough to pass a budget if when you have the fiscal majority requirement. second, how we got here, it's not unions. wages for americans have been going down the past 115 years. people are not keeping up with inflation. the average american worker has taken a 2011 pay cut when you compare what they made 10 years ago to what they're making now. -- $200
. right now you don't owe taxes on the forgiven debt. on the other side of the fiscal cliff you do. it gives homeowners a tax break on unpaid mortgage debt and expires on december 31st unless congress acts. >> the average amount that homeowners are short in a short sale is $95,000. if this tax break goes away as part of the so-called fiscal cliff, those homeowners could be taxed on that $95,000 as additional income starting in 2013. >> how much homeowners will owe in taxes on that amount depending on the tax bracket they're in. on average it would be between 20 to $25,000. the banks have an extra incentive to stel short and absorb the loss. under the national mortgage settlement act that went into effect earlier this year, the nation's biggest lenders get a credit for short sales as a form of foreclosure relief. foreclosures sell for $3700 less than homes via short sale. as we near the fiscal cliff you could expect short sales jump more as homeowners look it to aavoid gigt hit with tacks and bankss with foreclosed prormts. if we go over the cliff, the tax bill homeowners face with
of santa barbara. caller: we are in california here. we have gone over the fiscal cliff here. we are billions of dollars in debt. democrats and the labor unions are bankrupting this state. so democrat parties are so good why are we bankrupt? don't you think it's time that the unions instead of spending billions of dollars on political campaigns, give that money back to the membership so they can pay their own way? and as taxpayers and people like me that live on a fixed income don't have to be taxed out of our homes and lose the money we work hard to make? host: mr. welch. guest: first of all you have worked hard and -- but a couple things. number one, i can't comment on the california situation. i just don't know enough about it. although the reports are things are starting to turn around a little bit there. and it's very tough to pass a budget when you've got that superis majority requirement. number two -- supermajority requirement. number two, how we got here, it's not unions. the wages for americans have been going down for the past 10, 15 years. people are not keeping up wi
that these are my own personal views. lawmakers have to resolve three issues -- first, the fiscal cliff. second, raising the treasury debt ceiling, which as you know is becoming an issue rarely soon. third, achieving long-term fiscal sustainability. that is deficit reduction and tax increases and spending cuts that allow the gdp ratio to stabilize by the end of the decade. these three things need to be done now. in terms of the fiscal cliff, if policy is unchanged and we go over the cliff and there is still no change after that, the gdp in 2013 will 3.5 percentage points. subtract that and that is a severe recession. cbo and others are probably us are underestimating how severe that will be because confidence is very weak. it is unclear how the reserve would response to this. we need to scale back from the cliff. at the very minimum, the cliff needs to be scaled back so it is only a hit to gdp at 1.5 percentage points at most. if you have more of a drive than that, it it becomes it. the economy will weaken. the budget deduction will deteriorate. we are seeing a fiscal drag in europe. i would ar
with the fiscal cliff and dealing with our debt situation and not have a debt ceiling hanging out there as a diversionary but dangerous issue. but for some reason, inexplicable, the minority leader, the republican leader, changed his mind. now, he said on the floor well, important measures deserve 60 votes, but when he brought it up earlier, he acted as if he was in favor of it, he was offering it. and now, of course, essaying no, he's going to object to his own resolution. i wish he would reconsider. again, playing -- using the debt ceiling as leverage, using the debt ceiling as a threat, using the debt ceiling as a way to achieve a different agenda is dangerous. it's playing with fire. and yet, with the opportunity to take that off the table, reassure the markets, the minority leader blinked. i don't know why. it's hard to figure out the strategy that he's employing, but we would hope on this side of the aisle -- and i think i speak for all of us -- that he would reconsider and perhaps early next week let us vote on his own resolution. i yield the floor. mr. schumer: i notice th
different issues. the president is address the fiscal cliff, we're dealing with the debt and deficit. this is not about getting through this next month, this is about trying to solve the issues that we face as a nation today and that is the debt and deficit that we face. the president is very fond of talk about the math. let me give you a few things dealing with the math. 2012 will be the third highest revenue receipt into the united states government ever in the history of our nation. the third highest revenue ever received in the hithsroif the united states is coming in in 2012. in this down economy, as paychecks are smaller, federal revenue continues to increase. the president is very focused on trying to get the clinton tax rates but he ignores the clinton level of spending. what we've got to address is a trillion dollar deficit here. if wrp back at the clinton level of spending this would solve the issue that we're dealing with today. so we've got to find a way to address the real driver and real issue that we're facing, that is the spending. until we address that, it's not goin
these fiscal cliff developments. he is here with tonight's wrap- up. >> reporter: an knit tax you are right, the president and the speaker got on the phone but as if to signal the lack of progress the house got out of town. the republican controlled house left town wednesday saying it has nothing to do. >> we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and negotiate with ourselves. >> reporter: the president's treasury secretary said there's no room for negotiation on its demand for tax rate hikes for top income earners. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> absolutely. there's no prospect for an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going up on the top 2% of the wealthiest members. >> reporter: republicans insist they can get the revenue without increasing tax rates. >> the revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from, guess who, the rich. >> reporter: but the president says that won't work. >> it is not possible for us to raise the amount of revenue that's required for a balanced package if all you are relying on is closing deduct
to gdp. now, we don't want to get there that we. the same way we don't want to go over the fiscal cliff. in other words, the fiscal cliff is a big austerity. we get $7 trillion in the deficit reduction over the last ten years. but you don't do it the way we want to do it. when it comes to the baseline, we have to work together as part of an agreement to get the right baseline but that doesn't mean it is not for real world deficit reduction. it is. does it mean that it's better than the current law? maybe not. but there is an agreement that in the fiscal cliff is not the best way. >> we could add the baseline. the deficit to gdp. >> you said the deficit. >> you look at the current line baseline and get under 1% of deficit to gdp. >> seven years and 7 trillion of debt reduction. if anybody wants to read more about, please look at that space on what it takes. i thank you all for being here today. one reason we have to end it is that these people are going to be so instrumental in getting us out of this mess that we have to get them back to work. >> , come thank you. [applause] >> more abou
discover, is worry about the debt and the fiscal cliff. our program today, just briefly, others will talk, and we will give the polling results, and then a senior national journal member will have a panel discussion. it is a terrific day, i think. please turn these off. and, again, i welcome you. joan is the executive vice president of the country's largest insurance. you are in good hands with all state. joan has been a terrific partner. she is responsible of corporate relations for allstate. she did civil -- similar work with monsanto and others. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what washington is all about, so thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> ok. thank you. john, for that introduction. the national journal has been a terrific partner in supporting our work and the challenges that the american middle-class has been facing during this great recession, and i thank them for that. many thanks also to end, who will take us through the polling data to date -- many thanks take us through the polling data today, as well as one of his associates
should compromise and hear both sides. >> i think you should go off the fiscal cliff. americans are barreling down the road that's debt. there is a fork in the road. on the left are all our kids and our grand kids and the next generations. and on the right the road on the right is the fiscal cliff. really that the is choice if we don't do something about it we are going to go anyway. do you run over the kids with the car or do you take the other road which is not a good one but better than running over your kids fiscal cliff. it's a hard choice. >> but if we don't do it, if we don't go over the fiscal cliff the democrats will never cut a dime in spending. >> why would the democrats want change? if the bush tax cuts are going to expire they are saying this is great because this means the rich are going to pay more money, we are going to have more money to spend. they are already spending a the lo. they are saying why would we want change? this is great we have more money to spend. >> nancy pelosi saying why aren't we voting on middle class tax cuts? get to the other stuff. put th
's absolutely right, carl. a lot of people have been drawing similarities between the current fiscal cliff negotiations and that debt ceiling standoff from last year. so we have one former insider who joins us right now. he's been through this before. he probably knows how to read the signs better than just about anybody out there. bill daley was the white house chief of staff under president obama during the debt ceiling negotiations last year. mr. daley, thank you very much for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> reporter: we were just trying to figure out what to make of this. all morning long we've been saying it's relatively good news that we haven't within hearing from the principalprincipals. what does it mean now that speaker boehner is going to be addressing the house at noon. >> i think it's a strong sign there is movement. i don't know that. i'm not on the inside. i don't know what's going on. i doubt the speaker is going to stand up and speak to the body and say nothing's happening and we're not going anywhere and just give a partisan speech. so i'm hopeful tha
'll be back in a few minutes at 5:10. back to you guys. >> thank you. >>> looking at the fiscal cliff, well, the senate became entangled in one aspect of the federal debt problem thursday by debating a bill to allow the president to increase the debt ceiling without congressional approval. >> the republicans who initially brought the bill to the floor were not happy when it came to the changes that the democrats forced so they blocked it from moving forward. the president shared his views with a virginia family when it comes to the fiscal cliff and tax cuts that could happen. delia goncalves is live on capitol hill with more on that this morning. good morning, delia. >> reporter: good morning. mike, andrea, it appears we were here live on capitol hill just two weeks ago talking about a compromise. remember that? well, now we're back and it seems that those talks that had so much promise, well, they seem they've come to a screeching halt. now congress people are pointing the finger among increasing pressure to strike a deal before the january 1 deadline. they're now blaming each other for st
, the house and the white house, we hope that negotiations continue over the fiscal cliff. i want to ask you about the idea being discussed that raising the debt ceiling could be something that would be taken out of congress's purview andessential, for the president alone to make that decision, what do you make of that? >> insofar as we for talking about legislation, politically that, idea has to be deads on arrival. i don't know why congress would part with this, given to congress. this is an unwise proposal and not one that i see getting any traction. >> do you think that it is a broader, sort of look at different moves we have seen by this administration, to essentially go around congress, whether it comes to regulations or treaties or things that, in some ways have limited or no congressional intercention -- intervention, big policy decisions that impact americans as a whole. >> if it's an instance of the president's go-it-alone policy without congressional authorization, constitutionally, he is on the weakest possible ground. there is nothings in the constitution that can be read to the
a lot of the people who are making some statements. >> let's look at what the fiscal cliff really is. the fiscal cliff is almost $8 trillion of spending cuts, revenue increases. which if you want to affect the debt, that's a big way of doing it. every economist says if you do that much that quickly, you are going to throw us back into a serious recession. you know what? at some point, we have to stop kicking the can down the road and actually thinking of long-term debt of this country. i'm never a big fan of senator cobern's positions but he's right. at some point we have to stop this. we need to do it quickly. >> and the fact is, we've got a huge spending problem. and so either you have to figure out a way to pay for what you say you want to do or reduce the spending and that's the piece that's not getting the attention it should right now. >> getting the attention from? >> either the media in some cases. they are talking about what we have to do on taxes. somewhere along the line we have to talk about what we have to do on spending. if you do as the president asks and that is raise
will not play that game. >> tonight, democratic whip steny hoyer gives me the latest fiscal cliff developments and the democratic line on medicare. tom perriello from the center of american progress action fund on how democrats can deal with republicans who can't deal with reality. rubio and ryan reload with a new message for the middle class. >> both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. >> but there is no escaping their own policies. >> we're going to a majority of takers versus makers in america. >> dnc chair debbie wasserman schultz responds tonight. plus, senator barbara boxer on her new plan for national polling place standards. and a new poll shows half of all republicans think the defunct group a.c.o.r.n. stole the election from president obama. >> that's an eye opener. >> i wonder where they ever got that idea? >> you just have to wait and see what happens. >>> good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. here is are the latest. republicans are at a stalemate with the white house for debt negotiations. republicans really only have two opti
. >>> looking overseas, it's interesting to get a read on how other countries are perceiving the fiscal cliff fight on capitol hill. the"the washington post" ran through head lines in international papers. the gist of the coverage, china thinks the bickering in the u.s. is irresponsible. the people's daily says especially coming from a country that often tells other nations to be responsible. of course that's a big mouth piece for the communist party, that particular newspaper. heading across the pond to our friends in the uk, the financial times is blaming the g.o.p. for the inability to reach a deal thus far. and some german newspapers have started comparing the u.s. to greece. i've got to tell you, that's not really the fairest of comparisons. for the record, the headline in the post was, the rest of the world thinks the fiscal cliff is ridiculous. i think a lot of people here would agree with that headline. >> it's interesting -- i heard a report about it calling it slow, too, that it would take effect gradually. let's just get it done. >>> bright but brisk today and cold again tonight. >
to the council of economic advisers. the last eight or nine -- specifically to the fiscal cliff. when brought business leaders from 32 different states, the white house, and the message they are giving was pretty consistent with simpson-bowles and fixed the debt and how the business voices have been characterized in the media. they are anxious and they want certainty as quickly as possible. they tend to use simpson-bowles as the frame of reference. the question is not which plan, republican of democratic, is better. it is which plan is closer to simpson-bowles and why. host: here is "the hill" newspaper. obama-friendly business group given greater access to the white house. guest: well, first of all we -- what we do is bring business leaders from around the country to brief the president and economic team on everything from health care reform to immigration reform. the fiscal cliff, intellectual property protection. and the business leaders are speaking for themselves. generally speaking, business leaders are centrist, the data driven, results oriented, and they are looking for compromise in
a successful outcome not just to these fiscal cliff talks, but also to this longer-term issue of debt and deficit and economic growth. i was asked today to focus a little bit on what might be possible in terms of tax reform. i know tax reform and health care reform are the two topics we're discussing this morning and, again, i look forward to hearing from gene and also this distinguished panel behind us. with regard to the tax and health care reform issues, i'll make a simple point which is that if we go through this fiscal cliff discussion and do not take advantage of that opportunity to put in place reforms to the entitlement programs which are incredibly important but also up sustainable, and if we do not take advantage of it to look at our tax system which is antiquated, outdated, inefficient, we will have swappedderred the opportunity to really -- squanders the opportunity to address the long-term problem. we'll be right back on the cliff again. so the first fiscal cliff is approaching, we have to address it. if we do not, we'll see about $500 billion in tax increases, we'll see
:30 eastern. you can see the house live when they return here on c-span. in the meantime while fiscal cliff negotiations continue, we hosted a roundtable discussion about the debt talks and domestic program cuts on this morning's "washington journal." can host: isabel sawhim and james capretta. mr. capretta, let me begin with you. are these sequester cuts devastating? guest: they would be deep cuts. 80% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in the immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world? no. host: what do you mean by that? guest: there would be a downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of domestic accounts. so there would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduce in federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of 5%, 10%. so there would be some downsizing of the services that are provided by the federal government. but the economy would go on and the government would go on and the public would still continue to get by and large serviced. host: can agen
visible signs of progress in washington towards a fix for the fiscal cliff. the only hopeful sign is that republicans and democrats are talking privately again. but they haven't worked out any of the big issues, including what to do about the nation's debt limit. washington will hit its borrowing limit early next year, darren gersh has the latest. >> reporter: sitting around the kitchen table with a middle class family in virginia, the president once again pressed for congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. >> if this family has a couple of thousand dollars less to spend, that translates into $200 billion of less consumer spending next year. and that's bad for businesses, large and small. >> reporter: behind the scenes, the two sides are talking again. but there was no progress in public. senators today fought over the debt limit, and ended up deadlocked over a bill to allow the president to automatically increase borrowing. >> he's shown what he is really after is unprecedented powers to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> reporter: if the debt limit isn't raised, the
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